Category central banks

The UK crisis: Questions that Must be Asked: How was it allowed to happen?

The UK confidence crisis is not over yet. Chancellor Kwasi Kwarteng is saying nothing, hoping for stability. The Bank of England finds itself providing top cover by its willingness to hike rates. The Treasury Select Committee should be asking what advice the OBR, Treasury, The Bank of England and the Gilts Office gave Kwarteng.

The Everything Sell Off – Triggers and Consequences

Global Markets have nosedived – the UK’s confidence crisis is one trigger alongside rising recession risks, crashing consumer spending and host of indications we ain’t near done on higher interest rates as inflation becomes embedded into economies and dollar strength continues unabated.

Things are never as bad as you fear… are they?

The news looks bleak. A cataclysm of gloom is set to sink Europe and the UK – but, maybe things aren’t as bad as we think. Good news and a realisation things can get better could stabilize sentiment, and build a recovery base. Maybe?

Central banks, inflation and recession are the visible risks, but what if we are looking at all the wrong things?

Everyone is balancing inflation, economic numbers and this week’s Jackson Hole Central Bank smooze-a-thon to guess markets. What if we are looking at the wrong things – and economic divergence, income and wealth inequality and unravelling domestic politics are the critical factors?

Markets switching between inflation and recession threats show lack of clear direction.

Don’t be distracted by the antics in Westminster – there is a major market shift going on between the End of the World being triggered by Inflation, or Recession destroying everything. Relax. European Energy policy will probably kill us!

Outlook for the second half? Rising interest rates and ongoing supply shocks spell trouble

Stocks tumbled 20% in H1, but Central Banks are fixated on Inflation as the No 1 priority with higher interest rates nailed on. Supply chain issues remain difficult, meaning corporate earnings will remain under pressure. The market is setting up for further weakness through H2.